Posts Tagged ‘spring allergies’

Healthy Living: Clean Your Allergens Away

Spring is here and it’s time to break out the mop, dust off the duster, get out the cleaners and get your spring cleaning underway.  Spring also brings with it a whole new host of allergens that cause sneezing, wheezing, coughing and other seasonal symptoms.  To kill two birds with one stone, here are some ways to tackle those allergen hot spots in your home while getting a jump start on your spring cleaning at the same time!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • Avoid “bringing the outdoors inside.” If you know that you are allergic to pollen, then you will want to avoid keeping your windows open on a high pollen day.  If you spent a good deal of time outdoors, be sure to launder your clothes right away and shower and wash your hair to avoid spreading those allergens throughout your house onto your furniture and bedding.  Allergens tracked indoors can be potent enough for symptoms to last a few days
  • Use a vacuum with a HEPA filter.  HEPA or high-efficiency particulate air filters trap allergens better than normal vacuums.  You should use a vacuum with a HEPA filter at least once a week to remove allergens, if not more often.
  • Wash your bedding once a week.  Dust mites are the most common allergen that cause indoor allergy and asthma symptoms, and these mites thrive on soft surfaces.  Your mattress is your greatest exposure to these harmful allergens.  To decrease your exposure to dust mites, wash your bedding weekly in hot water (approximately 130 degrees Fahrenheit) and dry them on a hot dryer cycle.  It’s also good to encase your mattress, box springs and pillows in allergen-proof covers.
  • Clean your upholstery and drapes.  Again, because allergens cling to soft surfaces, your upholstery and drapes are also susceptible to seasonal allergens. Wash or dry clean your drapes when possible and vacuum sofas and chairs to remove any dust mites from your furniture.  You should also wash or dry clean any throw rugs you have lying around.  Whenever possible, you should use roller shades or vertical blinds as they accumulate less dust mites than drapes and other window coverings.  If you are renovating in the future, you should also avoid wall-to-wall carpeting and shoot for hardwood or tile floors instead, which are easier to clean and do not harbor allergens.

Spring is in The Air…And So Are Allergens


Now that the long, cold winter is behind us, spring is in the air… as are allergens, ragweed, pollen, and mold.  For those with seasonal allergies, spring can be quite a hard season to get through.

According to a study on www.health.com, the best action for fighting your spring allergies is to avoid the plants that make your coughing, sneezing, and watery eyes worse.

But many people aren’t sure exactly what combination of allergens that are affecting them.  Here is a list of some of the most popular plants and their allergens.

  • Ragweed It is common along riverbanks and in rural areas. Almost 75 percent of people with allergies are sensitive to ragweed.
  • Mountain cedarThis tree is commonly found in mountainous regions and, causes some of the most severe allergy symptoms around.
  • Ryegrass – This grass is common in dry lawns, meadows and pastures. This, along with other grasses, is often very problematic for allergy sufferers.
  • Maple – These trees are found along streams and in woods all through the eastern United States and Canada. The maple produces potent allergens.
  • Elm Common in the wetlands, these trees will most likely aggravate your allergies.

  • Mulberry – This pretty tree can be very deceiving.  Found in woods and river valleys, it is often associated with contributing to hay fever.
  • Pecan – Although it makes many good desserts, the pollen from pecan – found in woods and orchards – is second only to ragweed as the most severe source of allergens.

  • Oak It may have less potent pollen, but it produces very large quantities of it.  Avoid the woods just for this one.
  • Pigweed/Tumbleweed This common weed is found in lawns and along roadsides, but beware that it will not do your sinuses any good.

  • Arizona cypress – Found specifically in warm climates and well-drained soil areas, this tree can contribute to pollen problems almost all year round, according to the study.
  • Mold – Allergies acting up in the spring could be because of mold levels rising with wetter, warmer air.  The study contributes various types of molds to producing significant allergy symptoms throughout the United States.

While this only touches on a few possible plants and their related allergens, every day researchers are finding more and more possible allergens that people are dealing with in their lives.

Always seek medical advice when dealing with the treatment of seasonal allergies.

With Spring Comes Hay Fever: What Plants to Avoid


Spring is finally here! After a long and cold winter, everyone is in their glory with the sunshine and warm weather.

However, coming hand-in-hand with the blooming season is some people’s dreaded seasonal nightmare: hay fever.

One of the best plans of action for fighting spring allergies is to avoid the things that make your sneezing, itching and watering eyes worse. Warren V. Filley, M.D., a spokesperson for the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology, recently told health.com which plants you should avoid.

• Ragweed – It is common along riverbanks and in rural areas. Dr. Filley says that almost 75 percent of people with allergies are sensitive to ragweed.

• Mountain cedar – This tree is commonly found in mountainous regions and, according to Dr. Filley, causes some of the “most severe allergy symptoms I have ever seen.”

• Ryegrass – This grass is common in dry lawns, meadows and pastures. This, along with other grasses, is often very problematic for allergy sufferers, Dr. Filley says.

• Maple – These trees are found along streams and in woods all through the eastern United States and Canada. The maple produces potent allergens.

• Elm – Common in the wetlands, these trees will most likely aggravate your allergies.

• Mulberry – This pretty tree can be very deceiving. Found in woods and river valleys, it is often associated with contributing to hay fever.

• Pecan – Although it makes many good desserts, the pollen from pecan – found in woods and orchards – is second only to ragweed as the most severe source of allergens.

• Oak – It may have less potent pollen, but it produces very large quantities of it, Dr. Filley says. Avoid the woods just for this one.

• Pigweed/Tumbleweed – This common weed is found in lawns and along roadsides, but be aware that it will not do your sinuses any good.

• Arizona cypress – Found specifically in warm climates and well-drained soil areas, this tree can contribute to pollen problems almost all year round, according to the article.

• Mold – Allergies acting up in the spring could be because of mold levels rising with wetter, warmer air. Dr. Filley contributes various types of molds to producing significant allergy symptoms throughout the United States.

While this only touches on a few possible plants and their related allergens, every day researchers are finding more and more possible allergens that people are dealing with in their lives.

Keep in mind that medication will help most symptoms of allergies, but it’s best to see an allergist to determine the exact allergy that you are dealing with and treat that particular allergen, rather than taking a general “allergy pill” that encompasses many different symptoms and allergens.

The Scoop on Seasonal Allergies


Ahhh! Spring is finally here! After a long and cold winter, everyone is in their glory with the sunshine and warm weather. But with spring also comes seasonal allergies complete with the miserable sneezing, itching and sniffling.

So what are seasonal allergies exactly? Well, according to Allergies.about.com, a seasonal allergy is an allergic reaction to a trigger that is only around for certain seasons of the year. Such triggers can include pollen from trees, weeds and grasses. There are also perennial allergies that include triggers such as pet dander or molds.

More specifically, spring allergies are the result of pollen from trees that usually starts anywhere from January to April. Trees that commonly cause allergies include oak, olive, elm, birch, ash, sycamore, maple and walnut. These pollens are tiny egg-shaped powdery grains released from flowering plants and are carried by wind or insects. When pollen is in the air it can land in a person’s eyes, nose, lungs and skin causing allergic reactions.

Pollens that are spread by the wind are usually the main cause of season allergies. This pollen travels long distances and the levels that are in the air vary from day to day. Pollen levels can also vary between different geographic regions and depending on what time of day it is. Pollen is considered highest in the morning from 5 to 10 a.m.

Anybody who suffers from allergies probably knows immediately when their allergies have kicked it into high gear in the spring. However, most seasonal allergy symptoms include sneezing, runny nose, nasal congestion, and an itchy nose.

There are ways to avoid pollen exposure, however, including:

• Keeping windows closed to prevent pollen from drifting into your home

• Minimizing early morning activity when pollen is usually emitted — between 5-10 a.m.

• Keeping car windows closed when traveling.

• Staying indoors when the pollen count is reported to be high, and on windy days when pollen may be present in higher amounts in the air.

• Traveling to a more pollen-free area, such as the beach or sea.

• Avoiding mowing the lawn and freshly cut grass.

• Machine-dry your bedding and clothing. Pollen may collect in laundry if it is hung outside to dry.

With Spring Comes Hay Fever: What Plants to Avoid

spring allergies
Spring is finally here! After a long and cold winter, just about everyone is enjoying the sunshine and warm weather. However, along with the blooming season is the dreaded seasonal nightmare, hay fever.

According to MSNBC.com an estimated 35 million American suffer the unwanted return of the burning eyes, sniffles, chapped nostrils and stifled lunch of allergic rhinitis, or hay fever. Allergic rhinitis, often called hay fever, is the body’s immune system overreacting when it comes into contact with certain allergens such as pollen or mold. When people with allergies inhale these substances, an allergic antibody dubbed IgE treats them like dangerous invaders and gloms onto them. This triggers the release of histamines and other chemicals, which cause the trademark allergic response of sneezing, dripping nose, congestion and itchiness.

One of the best plans of action for fighting spring allergies is to avoid the things that make your sneezing, itching and watering eyes worse. Warren V. Filley, M.D., a spokesperson for the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology, recently told Health.com which plants you should avoid.

• Mountain cedar –This tree is commonly found in mountainous regions and, according to Dr. Filley, causes some of the “most severe allergy symptoms I have ever seen.”

• Ryegrass – This grass is common in dry lawns, meadows and pastures. This, along with other grasses, is often very problematic for allergy sufferers, Dr. Filley says.

• Maple – These trees are found along streams and in woods all through the eastern United States and Canada. The maple produces potent allergens.

• Elm – Common in the wetlands, these trees will most likely aggravate your allergies.

• Mulberry – This pretty tree can be very deceiving. Found in woods and river valleys, it is often associated with contributing to hay fever.Ragweed

• Ragweed – It is common along riverbanks and in rural areas. Dr. Filley says that almost 75 percent of people with allergies are sensitive to ragweed.

• Pecan – Although it makes many good desserts, the pollen from pecan – found in woods and orchards – is second only to ragweed as the most severe source of allergens.

• Oak – It may have less potent pollen, but it produces very large quantities of it, Dr. Filley says. Avoid the woods just for this one.

• Pigweed/Tumbleweed – This common weed is found in lawns and along roadsides, but be aware that it will not do your sinuses any good.

• Arizona cypress – Found specifically in warm climates and well-drained soil areas, this tree can contribute to pollen problems almost all year round, according to the article.

• Mold – Allergies acting up in the spring could be because of mold levels rising with wetter, warmer air. Dr. Filley contributes various types of molds to producing significant allergy symptoms throughout the United States.

In addition to avoiding certain plants, here is a list provided by MSNBC.com of other ways to avoid an allergy attack this spring.

The best way to cope with spring allergies is to avoid pollens. That usually means staying inside during the peak pollen periods — the early morning and late afternoon hours.

Shut the windows and crank up the air conditioner in both your house and car. That will help prevent pollens from drifting into your home.

Apply the same reasoning to your laundry: best to use the dryer so any allergens can be filtered out instead of hanging it on the line, where it becomes the filter.

Also, think about taking a vacation to a more pollen-free area, such as the beach or sea. And don’t mow lawns or be around freshly cut grass; mowing stirs up pollens and molds.