Posts Tagged ‘sleeping habits’

Back to School 101: Back to Sleep

As parents and their children enjoy their last month of summer, school is looming right around the corner. Now is the time to get back into a school sleeping schedule, after having such a lax sleeping schedule over the summer months.  According to the Federal Citizen Information Center, children between the ages of 6 and 9 require at least 10 hours of sleep per night and older children require at least 9 hours.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

To get your child in the school sleeping schedule:

  • Create a regular bed time and make sure you and your child stick to it.
  • Make sure your child avoids eating a heavy meal before their bed time.
  • Make sure your child avoids caffeine at least 6 hours before their bed time.
  • Allow for play and relaxation time before their bed time.
  • Create a bed time routine that is relaxing for your child, instead of stressful.

Sleeping Mistakes We Make Every Night

We have all been there a million times… checking the clock every few minutes and telling yourself that you NEED to fall asleep that very second or else tomorrow is going to be a super long day! But what typically happens? We have a terrible time falling asleep when we are under pressure of having to fall asleep!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

According to scientists, this condition is called psychophysiological insomnia and feeling pressure to fall asleep causes fragmented sleep and worsened sleep quality.

Psychophysiological insomnia affects nearly 15% of all chronic insomnia patients, and while you can’t make yourself fall asleep exactly when you want to, there are some things you can do to help your cause.

Instead of having negative thoughts like “I’m going to be worthless tomorrow if I don’t fall asleep now,” tell yourself “I’ve had sleeping problems before and have been able to function.”

Another suggestion from insomnia researchers is to delay your bedtime until you are truly sleepy, instead of when you think you should be in bed.

They also suggest having a bedtime snack like cheese and crackers or cottage cheese, to combine complex carbohydrates with tryptophan to help you sleep.

Lastly, don’t be a clock watcher as this will only give you more anxiety. Instead turn your clock around so that you cannot see what time it is during the night.

Snore-free Night’s Sleep!

Studies show that 30 to 40 percent of the general population snores… which means there are an awful lot of people out there not getting a good night’s sleep.  Whether you snore, or your partner, there are some easy ways to alleviate snoring and catch some zzzz’s before you know it.

snore free

Tongue exercises – believe it or not there are exercises that you can do with your tongue that will help “train” your tongue where to stay in your mouth while you are sleeping to prevent snoring.  One good tongue exercise to practice is making the “t-t-t-t-t” sound – sort of like you are scolding someone.  This strengthens the tip of the tongue.  You can also let your tongue hang out relaxed, then tense your tongue by pointing it and holding this position for three seconds.

 Buy a mouthpiece – one of the most effective anti-snoring techniques is using a “boil and bite” mouthpiece.  These mouthpieces form to your upper and lower teeth and pull your lower jaw and the back of your tongue forward.

This process allows your airway to be opened and you to breathe easier.

Nasal sprays – there are quite a few nasal sprays on the market that claim to help curb snoring, so it may have to be a trial and error process in finding one that works for you.   Some studies say that eliminating yeast overgrowth in your nostrils may reduce inflammation and nasal congestion, but it also causes snoring.

Sleep with a tennis ball – say what? Hear us out on this one… because most people snore while sleeping on their back if you provide a barrier between your body and your back while you are sleeping you will be less likely to sleep on your back throughout the night… thereby reducing your snoring.  Some people suggest putting a tennis ball in a pocket T-shirt then sleeping with the T-shirt on backwards.  You can also put the tennis ball in a fanny pack and then wear that backwards.  If you happen to turn onto your back during the night, the ball, whether it is in your shirt or in your fanny pack, will cause discomfort and you will roll onto your side.