Posts Tagged ‘new year’s resolution’

Winter Workouts: How to Get Your Workout In When Time is of the Essence


Even though nearly everyone makes a New Year’s Resolution to get healthy and exercise more, with the hustle and bustle of the New Year many people often lose track of time and don’t stick to either of these resolutions.

Fortunately, there are plenty of exercises that you can do if you only have a little bit of time in your day to do them.

These “mini workout sessions” not only allow you to be physically active during your busy day, but they also help to alleviate stress and provide consistency in your sometimes crazy life.

If you have 10 minutes…

Warm up with one to two minutes of brisk walking, then alternate two minutes running with 30 seconds walking.

If you feel good, gradually increase the speed of your run segments. Repeat three times. Jog easy for one minute to cool down.

If you’re stuck in the house, walk briskly from room to room and up and down stairs. Every minute, jog in place for 20 steps.

If you have 15 minutes…

Walk gently up and down a flight of stairs two or three times to warm up.

Then run up one flight and walk back down. Repeat four times, take a one-minute walk break on a flat surface, then continue the sequence as time allows.

If you’re in a stairwell, run up two flights of stairs, walk down, repeat, then take a walk break.

If you have 20 minutes…

On an out-and-back route, walk for one minute, then alternate 30 seconds walking with 30 seconds running for three minutes.

For the next six minutes, run/walk using any ratio you wish. At the 10-minute mark, turn around.

For the next nine minutes, run/walk whatever ratio you’d like, but pick up the pace during the run portion.

Cool down for one minute.

If you have 30 minutes…

Walk for two minutes, then alternate 30 seconds walking with 30 seconds running for six minutes.

For the next 20 minutes, alternate jogging for one minute, running a faster pace for one minute, jogging one minute, walking one minute. Repeat the sequence five times.

Walk or jog two minutes to cool down.

Good luck with these “mini” winter workout sessions and here’s to keep at least one of those New Year’s Resolutions!

Ring in a Healthy New Year!


Once again we are about to welcome in a New Year. If your New Year’s Resolution is to maintain your health and eat better in 2012, then these foods (and drinks) should be high on your grocery list!

Grains: Dieticians suggest that you increase your intake of oats, barley and rye in 2012. For years, doctors have been telling patients that eating oats can bring down your cholesterol and recent studies show that rye can, too. The American Diabetes Association has also noted that eating a diet high in fiber and grains, like rye, can help prevent the development of type 2 diabetes. Adding barley to your diet, whether it is as a side dish or inside a soup or casserole, can also lower your cholesterol and reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease.

Salmon and other oily fish: If the diagnosis is to get more vitamin D this year, then get your fill with salmon and other oily fish – such as, mackerel, sardines, herring, fresh tuna, trout and anchovies. Oily fish are some of the only food sources of vitamin D. These fish are also good for curbing cardiovascular disease. The American Heart Association recommends eating two servings of oily fish per week, but warns against eating too much more than that because some oily fish contain mercury, which can affect your brain and nervous system.

Soy: If 2012 is your year to help reduce your risk of cancer, then soy may be your answer. Research has shown that soy can ward off certain cancers as well as have an impact on your heart. The Food and Drug Administration states that 25 grams of soy protein a day can reduce heart problems by helping to lower cholesterol levels. To add soy to your diet, you can find it in soy burgers, tofu and soy milk.

Red Wine: While you will rarely hear any doctor advising that you drink any alcohol, red wine may just be the exception. Research shows that antioxidants in red wine, polyphenols, aid in protecting the lining of blood vessels in the heart. These antioxidants come in the form of flavonoids and nonflavonoids, which red wine has more than any other food or drink. Experts advise that you should stick to red over white wine because red grapes have 10 times more benefit to your health than white grapes. But, as with any alcohol, red wine should be enjoyed in moderation – approximately 5 ounces a day for women and 10 ounces a day for men.

Ten Simple Tips to Eating Better in 2011


Once again we have welcomed in a New Year. If your New Year’s Resolution is to maintain your health and eat better in 2011, then pay close attention to these ten simple nutrition tips from Healthcentral.com.

1. Add more variety- Your body requires over 40 nutrients for optimum health. So in order to stay healthy you’ll want to indulge in a wide range of colorful fruits, vegetables, lean meats, fish, whole grains, and low fat dairy products to help ensure that you get the vitamins and minerals you need.

2. Reduce your portion sizes– By simply keeping tabs on your portion sizes you can reduce your caloric intake and as a result maintain a healthier weight. By still indulging in smaller amounts of your favorite foods you don’t feel as deprived.

3. Eat meals at regular times-
Try eating several small meals per day in order to avoid unhealthy binge eating. It also helps to maintain a more stable blood sugar level, which is very important in keeping your energy level up all day.

4. Add more whole grain foods- Whole grains satisfy your body’s need for carbohydrates and also keeps your blood sugar swings to a minimum. It will make you feel fuller longer and keep overeating to a minimum.

5. Drink 8 glasses of water per day-
Our bodies natural processes require water in order to function optimally. Water can also help you feel full, so drinking plenty of water can also prevent overeating.

6. Don’t skip breakfast- As we’ve all heard before, eating a healthy breakfast gives you energy and nutrients that you need to get through the day. After all it’s the most important meal of the day so even if you’re not a breakfast eater make it your New Year’s Resolution to try to eat breakfast every day. Studies show that people who skip breakfast are more likely to overeat later in the day. The best breakfast is one that combines lean protein, with a little whole grain carbs, and some fruit and/or vegetables. For example, an omelet filled with two types of vegetables, and one slice of wholegrain toast. Or, a small bowl of oatmeal topped with berries, natural yogurt, and crushed nuts.

7. Choose broiled or grilled food rather than fried foods-
By simply broiling or grilling your food you can achieve a very similar taste to fried foods, but with significantly reduced fat content.

8. Be disciplined at the grocery store- It’s much easier to stick to a healthy diet if you try to only buy healthy foods when you purchase your groceries. It’s very difficult to avoid the temptation of cookies or chips when they’re sitting in your pantry at home. If you don’t buy them, you won’t be tempted to stray from your diet. Here’s an extra tip- instead of chips try pita chips and hummus and instead of cookies try fat-free pudding or yogurt.

9. Reduce your salt intake-
Eating foods that are high in sodium can contribute to high blood pressure in addition to water retention and weight gain. Choose low sodium versions of your favorite foods if possible, and don’t add salt to your food if you can help it. Instead try flavoring bland foods with herbs, spices, or citrus fruits instead.

10. Reduce the unhealthy fats in your diet-
Overly processed meats, or store-bought cakes and cookies, for example, tend to be high in trans or saturated fats, and these foods should be avoided mostly. However, you do need some fat in your diet. So, try using olive oil as a basis for salad dressings, cook with rice bran oil, use mashed avocado as an alternative to margarine spreads, and eat oily fish 1 or 2 times per week. Also, avoid anything that contains trans fats as much as you possibly can.

By following these ten simple tips you’ll be on your way to a healthier and thinner 2011.

Eating Better in 2010: Four Foods to Add to Your Grocery List

Eating
New Year’s resolution time has come and gone and if your resolution was to maintain your health and eat better in 2010, then the following foods and drinks should be high on your grocery list.

Grains- Dieticians suggest that you increase your intake of oats, barley and rye in 2010. For years, doctors have been telling patients that eating oats can bring down your cholesterol and recent studies show that rye can, too. The American Diabetes Association has also noted that eating a diet high in fiber and grains, like rye, can help prevent the development of type 2 diabetes. Adding barley to your diet, whether it is as a side dish or inside a soup or casserole, can also lower your cholesterol and reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease.

Salmon and other oily fish- If the diagnosis is to get more vitamin D this year, then get your fill with salmon and other oily fish – such as, mackerel, sardines, herring, fresh tuna, trout and anchovies. Oily fish are some of the only food sources of vitamin D. These fish are also good for curbing cardiovascular disease. The American Heart Association recommends eating two servings of oily fish per week, but warns against eating too much more than that because some oily fish contain mercury, which can affect your brain and nervous system.

Soy- If 2010 is your year to help reduce your risk of cancer, then soy may be your answer. Research has shown that soy can ward off certain cancers as well as have an impact on your heart. According to ABC News soy can also help breast cancer survivors.

A new study published in December of 2009 suggests that breast cancer survivors may benefit from eating moderate amounts of soy products. Soy foods are rich in compounds called isoflavones, a major group of plant-derived phytoestrogens possessing both estrogen-like and anti-estrogen actions. Researchers found that a higher intake of soy food, up to 11 grams daily, was associated with a lower risk of death or recurrence of breast cancer during follow up.

The Food and Drug Administration also states that 25 grams of soy protein a day can reduce heart problems by helping to lower cholesterol levels. To add soy to your diet, you can find it in soy burgers, tofu and soy milk.

red wineRed Wine- While you will rarely hear any doctor advising that you drink any alcohol, red wine may just be the exception. Research shows that antioxidants in red wine, polyphenols, aid in protecting the lining of blood vessels in the heart. These antioxidants come in the form of flavonoids and nonflavonoids, which red wine has more than any other food or drink.

As found on MSNBC.com thanks to its alcohol content and non-alcoholic phytochemicals, wine has been shown to reduce the risk of heart disease, certain cancers and slow the progression of neurological degenerative disorders such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s Disease.

However, the amount of wine you drink matters tremendously. If you drink more than what’s recommended, your health benefits are lost and health risks actually go up. Men should consume no more than two drinks per day and women no more than one drink per day, with a drink defined as a 5-ounce glass of red or white wine, 12 ounces or 1 bottle of regular beer or 1.5 ounces of 80-proof distilled spirits.

Remember, when adding or making substitutions to your diet moderation is essential. Anything that is good for you can easily become bad for you if consumed excessively. But by following these guidelines and including these healthy food and drink choices into your diet you could be well on your way to a healthier and slimmer lifestyle.