Posts Tagged ‘heart health’

Keep those Arteries Healthy

Cardiovascular disease is one of the leading health concerns today. We may associate heart disease with aging but the mechanisms that bring this condition start during the peak of our years. Being young does not excuse us from indulging in unhealthy eating habits. It might seem that we are indestructible going about our daily activities but just like a thief, all these habits creep into our body eating its way into our body.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stick to White Meat

Meat is an excellent source of protein and it should always be a part a healthy diet. But if you’re planning to consume meat everyday then sticking to white meat is an excellent way of keeping our arteries free from obstruction. Chicken meat is a good alternative to red or fatty meat. But before reaching out to that piece of chicken on the table make sure that you stay away from the skin. Chicken skin has the highest concentration of fat.

White meat refers to meat which is literally white   in color. Examples of white meat are those from chicken, fish, shrimps and even alligator meat. Red meat on the other hand refers to pork, beef, veal, mutton or those that are red in color.

Keep away from Sugary-drinks

Sodas and other sugary-drinks are known to cause diabetes but this has also been proven to be a cause of clogged arteries. Consumption of sodas could lead to weight gain, a tell-tale sign that heart disease might already be setting in. Sodas elevates blood pressure which could damage the arteries. Sugar content could also coat free flowing fats in the blood increasing the likelihood of these getting embedded in the arteries and clogging it up.

Eat More Veggies

Incorporating more vegetables into your every diet serves two purposes, it helps clear your body from impurities and inadvertently reduces your meat intake. Leafy vegetables in particular contain nitrates which are directly sourced from the soil. This is converted into nitric oxide and important ingredient for healthy blood circulation. It prevents the formation of plaques, resists blood coagulation all essential for the normal flow of blood. People who include leafy vegetables for example could lower their blood pressure by 11mmHg in a few hours.

Fish and Omega 3 rich foods

Fish has two factors going for it, it’s considered as white meat and is rich in Omega 3 fatty acids. Fish meat is leaner and contains none of the fat contained in animal or red meat. While the fat it contains which is Omega 3 works to clear the arteries.

A healthy diet is one that does not starve us from the things we love to eat. But one that promotes moderation and eating food in the right amounts. Most diets fail simply because people find them to stifling. Rather than encouraging people to stick to a healthy diet, it becomes a constant struggle for people each day.

Eating is one of the simplest joys of life. And denying ourselves of these simple joy makes life less interesting. Just remember to eat more healthy foods and keep everything to a minimum. The body has an excellent system for eliminating wastes that if left uncontrolled could clog our arteries. The problem is when our body finds itself overwhelmed and unable to eliminate artery-clogging deposits.

Heart Health 101: Obesity and Heart Disease

It’s a well-known fact that being overweight increases your chance of being at risk of many chronic diseases, including high blood pressure, stroke, and cardiovascular disease.  But research shows that even a small amount of weight loss can lessen your risk of falling victim to these deadly diseases.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Research also shows that, unfortunately, eating just 100 more calories a day than you should, can cause your body weight to be in the obese category and not just the overweight category.

To determine whether you are overweight or obese, use a BMI Calculator.  A BMI between 25 and 29.9 is considered overweight; a BMI between 30 and 39.9 is considered obese.  If your BMI is greater than 25 and you are older than 30 years old, you should strongly consider losing weight to reduce your risk of heart disease and other life-threatening conditions.

Heart Health: Obesity and Your Risk Factor

It’s a well-known fact that being overweight increases your chance of being at risk of a number of chronic diseases, including high blood pressure, stroke, and cardiovascular disease.  But research shows that even a small amount of weight loss can lessen your risk of falling victim to these deadly diseases.

Article 1

Research also shows that, unfortunately, eating just 100 more calories a day than you should, can cause your body weight to be in the obese category and not just the overweight category.

To determine whether or not you are overweight or obese, use a BMI Calculator.  A BMI between 25 and 29.9 is considered overweight; a BMI between 30 and 39.9 is considered obese.  If your BMI is greater than 25 and you are older than 30 years old, you should strongly consider losing weight to reduce your risk of heart disease and other life-threatening conditions.

Straight From the Headlines: Get Off the Couch and Stay out of the Doctor’s Office


A recent study conducted in Wisconsin and reported on Maxnewshealth.com, states that people who are couch potatoes are twice as likely to catch a cold and a third likelier to suffer bad or extreme symptoms compared to those who are healthy and fit.

According to the study, people who were considered fit or who exercised at least five days a week had between 4.4 and 4.9 “cold days” on average. Those who were moderately fit or who exercised one to four days per week had between 4.9 and 5.5 “cold days” on average. Those who were not fit and exercised one day a week or not at all had between 8.2 and 8.6 “cold days” on average.

Getting exercise unleashes a rise in immune defenses, helping to prepare our bodies to fight viruses and colds. Therefore, those who were fit or moderately fit had increased immune systems resulting in less “cold days” on average compared to the couch potato.

Furthermore, according to Getbetterhealth.com, about 60 percent of adults in the U.S. are not getting the exercise they need resulting in side effects even more sobering than the common cold.

If your idea of exercise is working out your TV remote reflexes then take a look at these statistics:

• Physical inactivity increases the risk of heart disease and stroke by 50 percent.

• Sedentary people have a 35 percent greater risk of developing high blood pressure than do physically active people.

• Inactivity is one of the four major risk factors for heart disease, on par with smoking, unhealthy cholesterol, and high blood pressure.

If you’re still undecided, Getbetterhealth.com outlines a few heart-health benefits of getting off the couch and getting your heart beating. Here are a few:

• For each hour you spend walking, you can gain two hours of life expectancy.

• More than half of the participants in a study who jogged two miles a day were able to stop taking blood pressure medication.

• Taking a brisk one-hour walk, five days a week can cut your risk for stroke in half.

• People with an active lifestyle have a 45 percent lower risk of developing heart disease than sedentary people.

To avoid becoming a full-blown couch potato and having to endure the unhealthy risks associated with lack of exercise it is advised that people exercise for at least 30 minutes a day, five days a week. If you find it difficult to find 30 minutes a day to get your heart pumping try breaking it up into two or three 10-15 minute sessions.