Posts Tagged ‘healthy new year’

Resolve to be a Better “You” in the New Year

The easiest way to kill your New Year’s resolution sometimes is to make one at all.  So, why not make the switch in 2018 to not make a resolution that you will most likely break a few days later, but choose a way to be a better person by making some inward and outward changes.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Get more sleep.  Besides helping you to feel energized during the day and improve your mood, getting more sleep can also aid in losing weight.  Your body repairs and rejuvenates during sleep… even calcium is added to your bones while you sleep!  Getting adequate sleep is the best way for your mind and body to be the best it can be.  While optimum sleep time varies from person to person, the average is 4 to 11 hours each day.  While getting to bed earlier is easier said than done, you should also avoid food for at least 2 hours prior to bedtime and eliminate all sources of light in your bedroom while you sleep.

Get out of toxic relationships.  You may have been talking about it for months or even years, but if you are in a toxic relationship – whether friendly or emotionally – make 2018 the year when you cut your ties. Don’t let your fears control you and break yourself free of when you cut your ties. Don’t let your fears control you and break yourself free of relationships that are doing you more harm than good.   Believe in yourself and good things (and good people) will come into your life.

Eat a fruit or a vegetable with every meal.  Studies show that Americans eat fewer fruits and vegetables than other countries, and disease prevention is directly linked to consumption of fruits and vegetables.  It seems like a no-brainer to get healthier through eating more fruits and vegetables, but for some it may be best to start small.  For example, add a banana to your morning cereal or make sure to eat a salad prior to dinner.

Be more social with friends.  Studies have found that having a very active social life can be very beneficial to your health.  Having an active social life can help you stick to healthy habits, fight disease and depression, reduce anxiety and stress, enhance your purpose in life, promote happiness, and even live longer.  Balance is key, though, so be sure to allow at least one day a week for some “me” time.

Fitness for All: New Year! New Workout!

Try these quick and easy ways to jump start your new workout regimen in 2017!

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  • Wear a pedometer to determine the distance you walk each day. Shoot for 10,000 steps per day.  If you aren’t reaching that goal, add an extra mile to your routine or take the steps instead of the escalator whenever possible.
  • Add jumping to your exercise routine – also known as plyometric moves – to build muscle and improve your bone density. Try jump squats or scissor lunges in your next routine.
  • Spend the extra money to purchase good work out necessities – clothing, shoes, bras, supports, etc. Purchasing the better brands versus going the cheaper route will ensure that you use them and that they are the best for your workout.
  • Don’t spread germs. Always wipe down gym equipment before and after using them to protect yourself and others from germs and bacteria that can be passed from unclean gym equipment.
  • Consider the other ways that you can lose weight without really trying – clean the house and burn 200 calories or work in the garden and burn 272 calories.
  • Even if you have to travel or spend all day in a car or on a plane, still try to fit in physical activity. Take advantage of bathroom breaks by stretching and doing some light exercise. Walk briskly through the airport in between flights if traveling by plane.
  • Build better bones and as much bone density as you can by doing weight-bearing activities like running or jumping as much as you can in your twenties and thirties.
  • Yoga has many healthy benefits for your body and your mind. Even if you are a novice, take a class and try something different.
  • Work out with your significant other or a friend or family member. This allows you to be a spotting partner for one another or just spend some quality time together working out.

Ring in a Healthy New Year!


We are about to welcome in a New Year once again.  If your New Year’s Resolution is to maintain your health and eat better in 2013, then these foods (and drinks) should be high on your grocery list!

Grains

Dieticians suggest that you increase your intake of oats, barley and rye in 2013.  For years, doctors have been telling patients that eating oats can bring down your cholesterol and recent studies show that rye can, too.  The American Diabetes Association has also noted that eating a diet high in fiber and grains, like rye, can help prevent the development of type 2 diabetes.  Adding barley to your diet, whether it is as a side dish or inside a soup or casserole, can also lower your cholesterol and reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease.

Salmon and other oily fish

If the diagnosis is to get more vitamin D this year, then get your fill with salmon and other oily fish – such as, mackerel, sardines, herring, fresh tuna, trout and anchovies.  Oily fish are some of the only food sources of vitamin D.  These fish are also good for curbing cardiovascular disease.  The American Heart Association recommends eating two servings of oily fish per week, but warns against eating too much more than that because some oily fish contain mercury, which can affect your brain and nervous system.

Soy

If 2013 is your year to help reduce your risk of cancer, then soy may be your answer.  Research has shown that soy can ward off certain cancers as well as have an impact on your heart.  The Food and Drug Administration states that 25 grams of soy protein a day can reduce heart problems by helping to lower cholesterol levels.  To add soy to your diet, you can find it in soy burgers, tofu and soy milk.

Red Wine

While you will rarely hear any doctor advising that you drink any alcohol, red wine may just be the exception. Research shows that antioxidants in red wine, polyphenols, aid in protecting the lining of blood vessels in the heart.  These antioxidants come in the form of flavonoids and nonflavonoids, which red wine has more than any other food or drink.  Experts advise that you should stick to red over white wine because red grapes have 10 times more benefit to your health than white grapes. But, as with any alcohol, red wine should be enjoyed in moderation – approximately 5 ounces a day for women and 10 ounces a day for men.

Ring in a Healthy New Year!


Once again we are about to welcome in a New Year. If your New Year’s Resolution is to maintain your health and eat better in 2012, then these foods (and drinks) should be high on your grocery list!

Grains: Dieticians suggest that you increase your intake of oats, barley and rye in 2012. For years, doctors have been telling patients that eating oats can bring down your cholesterol and recent studies show that rye can, too. The American Diabetes Association has also noted that eating a diet high in fiber and grains, like rye, can help prevent the development of type 2 diabetes. Adding barley to your diet, whether it is as a side dish or inside a soup or casserole, can also lower your cholesterol and reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease.

Salmon and other oily fish: If the diagnosis is to get more vitamin D this year, then get your fill with salmon and other oily fish – such as, mackerel, sardines, herring, fresh tuna, trout and anchovies. Oily fish are some of the only food sources of vitamin D. These fish are also good for curbing cardiovascular disease. The American Heart Association recommends eating two servings of oily fish per week, but warns against eating too much more than that because some oily fish contain mercury, which can affect your brain and nervous system.

Soy: If 2012 is your year to help reduce your risk of cancer, then soy may be your answer. Research has shown that soy can ward off certain cancers as well as have an impact on your heart. The Food and Drug Administration states that 25 grams of soy protein a day can reduce heart problems by helping to lower cholesterol levels. To add soy to your diet, you can find it in soy burgers, tofu and soy milk.

Red Wine: While you will rarely hear any doctor advising that you drink any alcohol, red wine may just be the exception. Research shows that antioxidants in red wine, polyphenols, aid in protecting the lining of blood vessels in the heart. These antioxidants come in the form of flavonoids and nonflavonoids, which red wine has more than any other food or drink. Experts advise that you should stick to red over white wine because red grapes have 10 times more benefit to your health than white grapes. But, as with any alcohol, red wine should be enjoyed in moderation – approximately 5 ounces a day for women and 10 ounces a day for men.