Posts Tagged ‘cold and flu season’

Adjust Your Lifestyle to Avoid the Flu

With winter comes the holidays, colds, flus and other events that wreak havoc on our immune system.  To boost our immune systems, we need to make some minor adjustments in our diet and lifestyle to help curb the impact the season has on our body.  Try these small adjustments this year:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Adjustment 1:

Get your Essential Fatty Acids

Because essential fatty acids are the key to building super hormones, make sure that you get enough of these fatty acids from nuts, seeds, fish, cold pressed oils and supplements.

Adjustment 2:

Eat Enough Protein

Protein is important for your optimal health no matter what season it is.  Nutritionists suggest .75 to 1.25 grams of protein per pound of your body weight depending upon your physical activity.  But, because our body can only absorb 30 to 35 grams per meal, we need to spread our protein intake throughout the day.  Be sure to eat some sort of protein in every meal and in every snack.  Getting some of that protein through soy-based products is also recommended by many nutritionalists.

Adjustment 3:

Choose low GI carbohydrates

GI or glycemic index, is the measure of how fast blood sugar rises after eating.  One good example is that white sugar has a glycemic index of 100, where peanuts have a glycemic index of 15.  That means that peanuts raise the blood sugar levels at 15% of the rate of white sugar.  Fast rising blood sugar means the pancreas produces and sometimes overproduces insulin.  These spikes in insulin can weaken the immune system and interferes with the production of super hormones.  By choosing low GI carbohydrates, combined with eating the appropriate levels of protein you can better control your insulin.

Overall, the best way to adjust your immune system this winter is to avoid too much supplementation, get enough protein and essential fatty acids, and avoid those sugary carbohydrates to make your way through these next couple months illness-free.

Managing Chronic Pain Naturally


It is estimated that around 100 million Americans are chronic pain sufferers. And a quick stroll into your local pharmacy’s extensive pain management section will confirm this. In today’s hustle and bustle world, finding relied from pain can be as easy as popping a pill. But even the “safest” pain medication is bound to have its own share of dangers and risks if not taken properly.

The danger with long term use of pain medications is that the body may become immune to its effects or worse damage vital organs such as the kidney. Some of us even go as far as self-medicate which could be dangerous even with the use of over the counter drugs.

There are definitely safer and more natural ways to manage pain. These methods do not only help in controlling pain but also restores the natural balance in our body. And one little known way is by simply switching to a healthier diet. This could be done by eating a plant-based, nutrient rich diet that reduces inflammation naturally.

A huge contributor to nagging chronic weight problems we see today could be traced to the Standard American Diet which has been described as one of the more inflammatory diets. Our fast food culture and salty snacks have lead to overweight, chronic pain and fatigue problems. Most of us seem to be unaware or generally unconcerned with how a typical western diet affects our health.

We are what we eat and most of the health problems we see today are diet or lifestyle related. Finding relief from chronic pain can be done by switching to a healthy diet. So the next time you’re planning a short trip to the pharmacy for some pain medications why not take a look into these simple tips before popping in that pill.

Eat green-leafy vegetables. If there is one great reason to start going the veggie route, it’s because it helps reduce chronic pain by increasing the number of good bacteria in the gut. This area of the body is constantly exposed to toxins from food and the environment. A healthy digestive system keeps our body in tip-top shape. Nutrients from food are processed better therefore strengthening our immune system. This is also the area where 96 percent of our serotonin is produced. Serotonin is a feel-good hormone that lessens the stress of chronic pain.

Cane sugar can be a good way of providing temporary relief from pain by stimulating reward centers in the brain but also increases pain levels in the long run. Sugars could set people suffering from chronic pain by 3-4 weeks. Avoid artificial sweeteners. Just because these are alternatives it does not mean that they are not likely to produce the same effects as other sugars.

Margarine and other hydrogenated contain fatty acids that coat cell membranes which interfere with cellular communication. It could also lead to toxin buildup and disrupt waste removal. A body full of toxins and lactic acid increases our risk for chronic pain.

Other foods that chronic pain sufferers should avoid include wheat and all its products. People should also avoid common allergens such as corn, eggs, peanuts and other dairy products.

Healthy sources of essential fatty acids include avocados, walnuts, fish and flax seed oil. Anti-inflammatory fatty acids reduce symptoms of asthma and chronic pain. Build your immune and inflammatory system by strengthening it with healthy fatty acids.

Stress is a major trigger for pain. This might only be psychological but it places so much pressure on our body that constant high levels of stress could lead to chronic pain. Low impact exercises such as swimming, brisk walking or yoga helps release pent-up stress. Getting enough sleep also helps the body recuperate more quickly.

Get that natural high by helping your body release more endorphins, the body’s answer for pain medications. Pain is our body’s signal that something is wrong physically. Pain is a personal experience and the intensity varies from one person to another. A positive attitude helps reduce the stress of pain and lessens our need for pain relievers. When we are able to handle pain naturally, we are able to live fuller and happier lives.

Prepare Yourself for Cold and Flu Season: Dos and Don’ts


Now that the kids are back in school and the weather is starting to change, it’s time to start worrying about the cold and flu season. By keeping the following dos and don’ts into consideration you can better protect your family and yourself.

Do use hand sanitizer – Carry a pocket-sized hand sanitizer with you at all times and use it generously whenever you are in public places. Germs are everywhere and on everything and by using hand sanitizer you are protecting yourself from bringing home these flu viruses.

Do wash your hands frequently – It may seem like the simplest thing to do, but be sure that you are washing your hands frequently with warm water and soap, and for at least 15 to 20 seconds. Teachers are now telling students to sing the ABC’s or Happy Birthday to themselves while they are washing their hands to be sure you are washing for a full 15 to 20 seconds.

Do sneeze into the crook of your elbow – By sneezing into your elbow, you are avoiding transmitting flu viruses to your hands and will keep you from passing the virus to others. It may seem socially awkward at first, but soon you will see more and more people doing this when they sneeze.

Don’t shake hands – To keep from transmitting germs, avoid shaking hands with people when you greet them. Try a head nod, waving or smiling instead to greet someone. If you can’t avoid shaking someone’s hand, then be sure to use your hand sanitizer following the hand shake.

Don’t use someone else’s phone or computer mouse – Phones and computers harbor some pretty heinous germs for hours. Avoid sharing someone else’s phone or computer mouse if at all possible. If you do have to use someone else’s phone or computer wipe it down with an alcohol swab prior to using it.

Don’t change a diaper without washing your hands immediately afterwards – This should be a given at all times and not just during the flu season. Stool harbors gastrointestinal bugs that cause diarrhea, vomiting and upset stomach. It may also contain H1N1, so anyone changing a diaper needs to be sure that they are washing their hands (for 15 to 20 seconds) following the changing.

Prepare Yourself for Cold and Flu Season: Do’s and Don’ts


Now that the kids are back in school and the weather is starting to change, it’s time to start worrying about the cold and flu season. But this year your worrying can be less if you take the following dos and don’ts into consideration and protect your family and yourself.

Do use hand sanitizer- Carry a pocket-sized hand sanitizer with you at all times and use it generously whenever you are in public places. Germs are everywhere and on everything and by using hand sanitizer you are protecting yourself from bringing home these flu viruses.

Do wash your hands frequently-
It may seem like the simplest thing to do, but be sure that you are washing your hands frequently with warm water and soap, and for at least 15 to 20 seconds. Teachers are now telling students to sing the ABC’s or Happy Birthday to themselves while they are washing their hands to be sure you are washing for a full 15 to 20 seconds.

Do sneeze into the crook of your elbow- By sneezing into your elbow, you are avoiding transmitting flu viruses to your hands and will keep you from passing the virus to others. It may seem socially awkward at first, but soon you will see more and more people doing this when they sneeze.

Don’t shake hands- To keep from transmitting germs, avoid shaking hands with people when you greet them. Try a head nod, waving or smiling instead to greet someone. If you can’t avoid shaking someone’s hand, then be sure to use your hand sanitizer following the hand shake.

Don’t use someone else’s phone or computer mouse- Phones and computers harbor some pretty heinous germs for hours. Avoid sharing someone else’s phone or computer mouse if at all possible. If you do have to use someone else’s phone or computer wipe it down with an alcohol swab prior to using it.

Don’t change a diaper without washing your hands immediately afterwards- This should be a given at all times and not just during the flu season, but stool harbors gastrointestinal bugs that cause diarrhea, vomiting and upset stomach. It may also contain H1N1, so anyone changing a diaper needs to be sure that they are washing their hands (for 15 to 20 seconds) following the changing.

Stay Healthy This Winter by Following these Nine Simple Tips


Winter time is synonymous with cold and flu season. But this year you can help to ward off the winter sniffles by following these few simple health tips. Keep these in mind to quickly and easily boost your immune system and keep you healthy right through spring.

1. Exercise- Exercise, in moderation, is a great way to boost your immune system for the winter. Because exercise improves your circulation, immune cells are able to get around your body better to target viruses.

2. Sunshine- Vitamin D, which is produced in the skin after exposure to the sun, is a great boost for your immune system and cell defense. Even getting outdoors when the sun is shining, despite the cold weather, will do wonders for your body.

3. Echinacea- According to a study put out last year, Echinacea, an herbal medicine, could reduce the risk of you catching a cold by half. The study also looked into its effectiveness in treating more serious respiratory infections, as well. Echinacea is said to regulate the immune system’s response to infection.

4. Water- According to Suite101, you should be drinking, in daily ounces, half your body weight in pounds (i.e. body weight in pounds, divided by 2 = number of ounces of water per day. Drinking plenty of water will ensure healthy food metabolism, it will eliminate toxins or wastes from your body, carry vital nutrients, and regulate your body’s temperature.

5. Diet- What you eat and what vitamins and minerals that food contains is also a huge boost to your immune system. Many doctors agree that a balanced and varied diet is key to help ward off sickness. A diet rich in vitamin C, zinc, iron and selenium will give your immune system that boost.

6. Stimulants- Be aware of the amount of stimulants that you put into your body. Where no research shows that an abundance of stimulants have an adverse effect on your immune system, moderation should be used when dealing with caffeine, alcohol and over-the-counter drugs. If you are looking for a stimulant that could help you immune system, try green tea instead. The antioxidants in green tea will help to prevent illness in the long run.

7. Sleep- If you are looking for a surefire way to help ward off a cold and the flu this year, be sure to get your seven hours a sleep per night. Sleep is extremely important and many doctors agree that lack of sleep can have a negative response on our immune system and our body as a whole.

8. Meditation- Even just 20 minutes a day of peace, quiet and relaxation can have a major impact on your immune system and can help to ward off winter colds. If you are able to put your body into a meditative state at least once a day, your bodies’ cells will be able to rejuvenate tremendously. Meditation is also a good stress reliever and can allow you to re-energize.

9. Mood/Stress- Being positive and avoiding stressful situations are both excellent immune boosters. While everyone’s mood and stress levels are different, studies have shown that chronic stress and depression have been linked to a weakened immune system. It’s important to find the stress in your life and work to deal with that stress in a positive way or to eliminate the stressful situations entirely.

Prepare Yourself for Cold and Flu Season: Do’s and Don’ts


Now that the kids are back in school and the weather is starting to change, it’s time to start worrying about cold and flu season. According to MSNBC, while the flu can resemble a cold, the flu has more severe symptoms including fever, achy joints, sore throat, chills, congestion, headache and hacking cough. In addition, children sometimes come down with nausea, vomiting and diarrhea when they catch the flu.

Adults can pass the virus to others a day before they feel sick and up to 7 days after symptoms appear, according to experts. So it is possible to give someone the flu even before you know you’ve got it yourself. Therefore it’s important to take steps to protect you or your family from getting it in the first place. Here’s some do’s and don’ts to keep in mind:

Do Use Hand Sanitizer- Carry a pocket-size hand sanitizer with you at all times and use it generously whenever you are in public places. Germs are everywhere and on everything and by using hand sanitizer you are protecting yourself from bringing home these flu viruses.

Do Wash Your Hands Frequently- It may seem like the simplest thing to do, but be sure that you are washing your hands frequently with warm water and soap, and for at least 15 to 20 seconds. Teachers are now telling students to sing the ABC’s or Happy Birthday to themselves while they are washing their hands to be sure you are washing for a full 15 to 20 seconds.

Do Sneeze Into the Crook of Your Elbow- By sneezing into your elbow, you are avoiding transmitting flu viruses to your hands and will keep you from passing the virus to others. It may seem socially awkward at first, but soon you will see more and more people doing this when they sneeze.

Do Fight Back with Food-
Research shows that adding certain foods to an already healthful diet can increase your ability to fend off colds and flu. Try yogurt, garlic, black tea, mushrooms, and fatty fish.

Don’t Shake Hands– To keep from transmitting germs, avoid shaking hands with people when you greet them. Try a head nod, waving or smiling instead to greet someone. If you can’t avoid shaking someone’s hand, then be sure to use your hand sanitizer following the hand shake.

Don’t Use Someone Else’s Phone or Computer Mouse– Phones and computers harbor some pretty heinous germs for hours. Avoid sharing someone else’s phone or computer mouse if at all possible. If you do have to use someone else’s phone or computer wipe it down with an alcohol swab prior to using it.

Don’t Change a Diaper Without Washing Your Hands Immediately Afterwards-
This should be a given at all times and not just during the flu season, but stool harbors gastrointestinal bugs that cause diarrhea, vomiting and upset stomach. It may also contain H1N1, so anyone changing a diaper needs to be sure that they are washing their hands (for 15 to 20 seconds) following the changing.

Winter Immune Boosters

winter immune boosters
We’re right smack in the dab of winter and it’s more important to boost your immune system this time of the year more than any other. Winter time is synonymous with cold and flu season, so why not try a few methods for warding off those winter sniffles?

Here are some winter immune boosters that will help to keep you healthy right through spring:

Diet- What you eat and what vitamins and minerals that food contains is also a huge boost to your immune system. Many doctors agree that a balanced and varied diet is key to warding off sickness. A diet rich in vitamin C, zinc, iron and selenium will give your immune system that boost.

According to CNN.com your nutrition profoundly affects your ability to fight these diseases. Filling up your plate with lean protein, including chicken, fish and fat-free dairy products is essential. The molecules that fight disease are made of protein.

Certain fats also improve cellular function and the ability to fight disease. Healthy fats such as olive oil, canola oil and nuts are healthy fats that can boost immunity.
It’s also important to include fruits, vegetables and whole grains in our diet. These contain important antioxidants that keep blood levels of vitamin c, beta-carotene, zinc and B-vitamins high.

Exercise- Exercise, in moderation, is a great way to boost your immune system for the winter. Because exercise improves your circulation, immune cells are able to get around your body better to target viruses.

winter immune boosters 2Sunshine- Vitamin D, which is produced in the skin after exposure to the sun, is a great boost for your immune system and cell defense. Even getting outdoors when the sun is shining, despite the cold weather, will do wonders for your body.

Echinacea- According to a study put out last year, Echinacea, an herbal medicine, could reduce the risk of you catching a cold by half. The study also looked into its effectiveness in treating more serious respiratory infections, as well. Echinacea is said to regulate the immune system’s response to infection.

Stimulants- Be aware of the amount of stimulants that you put into your body. Where no research shows that an abundance of stimulants have an adverse effect on your immune system, moderation should be used when dealing with caffeine, alcohol and over-the-counter drugs. If you are looking for a stimulant that could help your immune system try green tea instead. The antioxidants in green tea will help to prevent illness in the long run.

Sleep- If you are looking for a surefire way to help ward off a cold and the flu this year, be sure to get your seven hours a sleep per night. Sleep is extremely important and many doctors agree that lack of sleep can have a negative response on our immune system and our body as a whole.

Meditation- Even just 20 minutes a day of peace, quiet and relaxation can have a major impact on your immune system and can help to ward off winter colds. If you are able to put your body into a meditative state at least once a day, your bodies’ cells will be able to rejuvenate tremendously. Meditation is also a good stress reliever and can allow you to re-energize.

Mood/Stress- Being positive and avoiding stressful situations are both excellent immune boosters. While everyone’s mood and stress levels are different, studies have shown that chronic stress and depression have been linked to a weakened immune system. It’s important to find the stress in your life and work to deal with that stress in a positive way or to eliminate the stressful situations entirely.