Archive for November, 2016

Load Up on Vitamin C this Flu Season

Sniffling, sneezing, coughing, hacking… the sounds of cold and flu season are upon us.  If you are one of those people that start chugging O.J. as soon as you hear these familiar sounds, then you are already ahead of the cold and flu fighting game.  While vitamin C cannot prevent a cold, it can shorten the length of time you battle a cold or lessen the severity of your cold.

While people typically turn to oranges and their juice to get their daily dose of vitamin C, the 69.7 mg of vitamin C in a medium size orange is actually less than many other common fruits and veggies. If you are looking for an alternative to get your daily dose of vitamin C and help curb the symptoms of the cold and flu season, check out these other options.

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Pineapple – Along with 78.0 mg of vitamin C, pineapple also contains bromelain, a digestive enzyme that breaks down food and helps to reduce bloating.

Chili peppers – Just a half cup of chopped chili peppers or diced chili peppers have 107.8 mg of vitamin C. Plus capsaicin, the compound that makes chili peppers hot can also help to relieve joint and muscle pain.

Red bell peppers – At 190 mg, a cup of chopped red peppers contains nearly three times more vitamin C than an orange.  They are also a great source of vitamin A, promoting healthy eyes.

Green bell peppers – Even though it isn’t as power packed as its red sister, a cup of chopped green peppers contains 120 mg of vitamin C. It’s also a great source of fiber.

Kale – A one cup serving of kale provides 80.4 mg of vitamin C, along with twice your recommended daily allowance of vitamin A and seven times the recommended amount of vitamin K.  Kale also provides numerous minerals and fatty acids.

Cauliflower – Cauliflower gives you 127.7 mg of vitamin C, plus 5 grams of fiber and 5 grams of protein.

It’s Turkey Time… How many calories are in your meal?

November is here and once again families will gather around to take part in the traditional Thanksgiving feast.

But, before you carve that turkey or dig into those casseroles, here is a handy calorie calculator that can tell you exactly how many calories are in your meal.

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Main Course:

6 oz. cured ham: 300 calories

6 oz. white and dark turkey: 340 calories

½ cup stuffing: 180 calories

½ cup cranberry sauce: 190 calories

½ cup mashed potatoes: 150 calories

½ cup gravy: 150 calories

½ cup green bean casserole: 225 calories

½ cup candied sweet potatoes: 150 calories

1 dinner roll: 110 calories (45 extra calories with one pat of butter)

 

Drinks:

1 mixed drink: 250 calories

1 glass of wine: 120 calories

1 glass of cider: 120 calories

1 cup eggnog: 343 calories

 

Salads and Appetizers:

3 cups salad (with light dressing):  100 calories

½ cup jello with fruit: 120 calories

½ cup Waldorf salad: 110 calories

1 cracker with cheese: 70 calories

½ cup mixed raw vegetables: 25 calories

½ cup mixed nuts: 440 calories

1 oz. tortilla or potato chips: 150 calories (75 extra calories per tablespoon of dip)

 

Desserts:

2 small chocolate chip cookies: 150 calories

1 piece apple pie: 410 calories

1 piece pecan pie: 480 calories

1 piece pumpkin pie: 180 calories

½ cup whipped cream: 75 calories

½ cup ice cream: 145 calories

 

Leftovers:

1 turkey sandwich with mayo and cranberry sauce: 450 calories

1 open-face turkey sandwich with stuffing and gravy: 290 calories

 

Myths of the Common Cold

Every year around cold and flu season, we hear the old wives tales about the common cold… feed a cold and starve a fever, and so on and so forth.  But what tales are indeed true and which ones are myths?  Here we touch on a few of those true tales and debunk some others.

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Chicken Soup:  So grandma always said that chicken soup is good to fight the common cold and she was half right… chicken soup has been shown to relieve inflammation.

Wet hair: Going outside with wet hair will not cause the common cold… but that doesn’t mean that you should do it either.

Feed a cold, starve a fever:  This is the one that has enough calories.

Wearing a coat: Common colds and the flu are caused by viruses not by temperature. And while they do circulate more during the winter months, you are more likely to pick up a cold or the flu inside more so than outside so wearing a coat or not wearing a coat does not indicate whether or not you will catch a cold.  Studies show that you can actually prevent some colds by getting physical exercise outdoors during the winter months.

Vicks Vapor Rub on Your Feet:  A widely spread email last year stated that you should put Vicks Vapor Rub on your kids feet and put socks on them to get rid of a nagging cough.  This myth was debunked and experts suggest that you should stick to using the vapor rub on your kid’s chest and throat instead.

Health experts are constantly conducting research and learning more and more about the benefits of exercise for the elderly.  Sedentary adults are more likely to suffer from heart disease, diabetes, high blood pressure, certain cancers, and joint and muscle disorders.

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To help ward off these conditions and to deal with the everyday wear and tear that aging has on our bodies, experts suggest that individuals over the age of 50 should consult their physician and a personal trainer to come up with a fitness plan that works for them.

Another condition that exercise for the elderly has proven to help is the arthritis-striken.

The appropriate exercises can reduce inflammation and relieve stiffness in those particular joints.  It also increases flexibility, muscle strength, power and stamina.

Elderly adults who exercise also gains the benefits that their younger counterparts also gain including: weight control, the ability to manage daily stress and improved self-confidence.

Experts have also found that exercising as you age can also reduce the risk of premature death, can curb depression and minimizes the development of brittle bones.

Spotlight on Turkey

Eating Healthy

  • One good thing about the nutritional value of turkey is that it is very low in fat and high in protein.
  • It is also a good source of iron, zinc, phosphorus, potassium and B vitamins.
  • Turkey is also naturally low in sodium. It typically contains less than 25 milligrams (mg) of sodium per ounce on average.
  • The meat fiber in turkey is easier to digest than other types of meat, so that makes turkey a good choice for individuals that have digestion problems.

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Recipe: Turkey Chili

  • 2 cups chopped onion
  • 4 garlic cloves, chopped fine
  • 1 cup chopped green pepper
  • ¼ cup olive oil
  • 2 (35 oz.) cans stewed tomatoes, crushed
  • 2 (15 oz.) cans kidney beans, drained
  • 2 tablespoons tomato paste
  • ¾ cup chicken or turkey stock
  • 2 tablespoons chili powder
  • 1 tablespoon ground cumin
  • 1 tablespoon dried hot red pepper flakes
  • 1 teaspoon dried oregano
  • 1 tablespoon salt, plus more if desired to taste
  • ½ teaspoon black pepper
  • 3 to 4 cups shredded, cooked turkey meat
  • Sugar
  • Shredded cheddar cheese, chopped red onion, sour cream for optional garnishes

 

In a large, 8-quart thick bottom pot, cook the onion and green pepper over medium heat, stirring until golden, about 5 minutes.  Add the garlic, chili powder, cumin, and red pepper flakes, and cook, stirring, for a minute or two more.  Add a bit more olive oil if needed.  Add tomatoes, tomato paste, stock, beans, oregano, salt, pepper and cooked turkey meat.  Bring mixture to a simmer and reduce heat to low.  Simmer, uncovered for an hour.

Salt to taste.  Add 1 to 3 tablespoons of sugar to take the edge off the acidity of the tomatoes, if desired.

Serve with shredded cheddar cheese, chopped red onion or sour cream.  Serve alone, over rice or with corn bread.

 

 

 

 

Ditch the Razor – It’s Movember

Awareness 101

If you have been wondering why all of the men in your life seem to be sprouting more and more facial hair these days, wonder no more – it’s Movember! (Also known as No Shave November.)

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The meaning behind Movember is raise awareness for prostate cancer and testicular cancer and began in Australia more than 11 years ago.  Males participating not only talk about why they are participating but also get other men to start talking about men’s health and cancer awareness.  Men participating are also encouraged to donate what they would otherwise spend on grooming/shaving to the American Cancer Society.

Don’t worry, ladies, you are encouraged to participate as well… you can forego shaving your legs or cancel the waxing/threading appointment that you have planned for the month.