Health 101: Ways to Tell You Are Not Getting Enough Protein

April 1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Our bodies have a unique way of telling us when we are not getting enough protein in our diet. Here are seven great ways that show us we are lacking protein:

  • You are constantly weak and hungry.
  • You muscles no longer have definition.
  • You are struggling to lose weight.
  • You are losing your hair.
  • You are always getting sick.
  • Your lower legs and feet swell unexpectedly.
  • Your skin gets patchy in places.

 

Calorie Counter, Easter Basket Candy

Food for Thought

Easter Basket Candy

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sure, one or two candy eggs seem harmless… but think again. While it’s ok to satisfy your sweet tooth use this calorie calculator to monitor your intake!

From marshmallow peeps to chocolate, find out the calories of the content of your Easter basket…

4 Peeps Marshmallow Bunnies: 130 calories

1 Peeps Hollow Milk Chocolate Egg: 420 calories

5 Mars Mini Chocolate Eggs: 179 calories

1 Cadbury Solid Milk Chocolate Easter Bunny: 890 calories

1 Cadbury Crème Egg: 150 calories

12 Cadbury Chocolate Eggs: 190 calories

1 Dove Solid Chocolate Easter Bunny: 230 calories

1 Nestle’s Crunch Solid Chocolate Easter Bunny: 692 calories

1 Snickers Cream Sports Egg: 140 calories

1 Reese’s Peanut Butter Egg: 180 calories

1 Reese’s Reester Bunny: 798 calories

1 Brachs Chocolate Covered Marshmallow Egg: 43 calories

5 Brachs Malted Easter Eggs: 180 calories

35 Jelly Belly Assorted Jelly Beans: 140 calories

1 Cadbury Caramel Egg: 190 calories

5 Peeps Marshmallow Chicks: 136 calories

1 Large Solid Chocolate Bunny (7 oz.): 1050 calories

8 Robin Eggs: 180 calories

1 Milky Way Bunny: 160 calories

12 Cadbury Mini Eggs: 190 calories

5 Mini Kit Kats: 210 calories

1 Hollow Chocolate Bunny: 270 calories

2 Tootsie Roll Snack Bars: 100 calories

2 Small Boxes of Dots: 140 calories

 

 

Plants to Avoid this spring

Healthy Living

Plants to Avoid

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Spring is finally here! After a long and cold winter, everyone is in their glory with the sunshine and warm weather.

However, coming hand-in-hand with the blooming season is some people’s dreaded seasonal nightmare: hay fever.

One of the best plans of action for fighting spring allergies is to avoid the things that make your sneezing, itching and watering eyes worse.  Warren V. Filley, M.D., a spokesperson for the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology, recently told www.health.com which plants you should avoid.

  • Ragweed – It is common along riverbanks and in rural areas. Dr. Filley says that almost 75 percent of people with allergies are sensitive to ragweed.

Mountain cedar –This tree is commonly found in mountainous regions and, according to Dr. Filley, causes some of the “most severe allergy symptoms I have ever seen.”

  • Maple – These trees are found along streams and in woods all through the eastern United States and Canada. The maple produces potent allergens.
  • Elm – Common in the wetlands, these trees will most likely aggravate your allergies.
  •  Mulberry – This pretty tree can be very deceiving. Found in woods and river valleys, it is often associated with contributing to hay fever.

 

  • Pecan – Although it makes many good desserts, the pollen from pecan – found in woods and orchards – is second only to ragweed as the most severe source of allergens.

 

  • Oak – It may have less potent pollen, but it produces very large quantities of it, Dr. Filley says. Avoid the woods just for this one.

 

Mold – Allergies acting up in the spring could be because of mold levels rising with wetter, warmer air.  Dr. Filley contributes various types of molds to producing significant allergy symptoms throughout the United States.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Building a Smarter Child

In the News

Smarter Child

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Every parent wants to believe that their child is a genius or has the genius potential.  While intelligence clearly has a genetic component, there are some things you can do to boost learning and intelligence in your child.

Play brain games – Games like chess, cryptograms, riddles, and crosswords all train the brain to perform harder than other games.  These games promote strategic thinking, problem-solving, and complex decision making.  If you keep these games on hand and challenge your children with them you will help boost their intelligence… in a fun way.

Encourage them to play an instrument – While the early days of your child learning an instrument may not be the most pleasing to the ears, by encouraging your child to take up playing an instrument they learn to utilize their right brain more than others who do not play an instrument.

Avoid junk food – Cut out (or significantly reduce) the amount of sugar, trans fats and other junk food in your child’s diet and replace them with high-nutrient alternatives for early childhood mental and motor development.  Pay attention to what your child is eating and good grades will come in time!

Encourage curiosity – Allow children to explore new ideas and become interested in different hobbies and interests to foster intelligence.  Ask your child about their interests and allow them to try a number of different hobbies and activities throughout the course of their childhood.

Read – While this method often gets lost in today’s hi-tech world, reading to your child and/or encouraging them to read may be the oldest, easiest and one of the most effective ways to boost your child’s brain power.

The Spring Clean Burn, How to Lose Weight Cleaning

Fitness for All

Spring Clean

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

It’s finally time to skip the gym and dust off those mops and brooms! Spring cleaning is here – along with an easy way for you to not only clean up your house but also burns those extra calories.

In just 30 minutes of household cleaning, you can burn nearly 200 calories.  So, say goodbye to the gym and hello to the scrubbing brush!

Your actual amount of calories burned will depend on your weight, gender and age, but the following calorie burners are based on a 155 pound woman cleaning for one hour.   (You can locate calculators online to determine the exact amount of your calories burned.)

 

Gardening: 226 calories

Window washing: 226 calories

Scrubbing floors (on hands and knees): 291 calories

Laundry, ironing: 84 calories

Sewing repairs: 36 calories

Dusting: 97 calories

Scrubbing toilets, tub: 246 calories

Vacuuming: 317 calories

Cleaning gutters: 258 calories

Moving furniture, household items: 387 calories

Painting, papering, plastering: 317 calories

Sweeping: 194 calories

Mopping: 153 calories

Mowing the lawn: 148 calories

Washing dishes: 77 calories

Goji Berry

Project Review

If you are looking for an energy boost, the Goji Berries contain astronomical levels of unique bio active polysaccharides, a family of complex carbohydrates bound to proteins that defends the body against illness, pollutants and free radicals.

These “master molecules” control many of the body’s most important biochemical defense systems. The Goji Berries of Himalayan descent may be the richest known source of glyconutrients.

Some of the benefits include: boost in energy and strength, reduces cholesterol, helps promote weight loss, strengthens your heart, maintains healthy blood pressure and more. The one con of the Goji Berry is that you might get too much energy if you take two capsules to start.  We only recommend taking one capsule to start.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Spotlight on Mangoes

Eating Healthy

Spotlight on Mangoes

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • Mangoes are an excellent source of vitamins A and C, and they are also an excellent way to replenish potassium lost through exercise or for those who are constantly “on the go.”
  • An average-sized mango can even contain up to 40 percent of your daily fiber requirement, thereby being a great way to curb constipation and irregularity.

Getting your daily fiber requirement, through fruits like mangoes, can help protect against degenerative diseases, especially those of the heart.

Recipe: Jamaican Jerk Chicken Salad

½ cup prepared or purchased honey mustard dressing

1 teaspoon finely grated lime zest

4 chicken breast halves without skin, boneless

1 tablespoon Jamaican Jerk seasoning

2 large fresh mangoes

10 to 12 cups mixed greens

Stir together honey mustard dressing and lime zest.  Cover and chill dressing while preparing chicken.

Rinse chicken and pat dry; sprinkle with Jerk seasoning.  In a large skillet cook the seasoned chicken in hot oil over medium-high heat about 6 minutes on each side until browned and no longer pink.  Thinly slice each chicken breast.

Arrange warm chicken and mango atop greens on four plates; drizzle with the honey mustard dressing.

Recipe:  Mango Pork

2 medium ripe mangoes

1 pork tenderloin, about ¾ pound

Cooking spray or olive oil

Salt and pepper to taste

Hot pepper sauce

Put pulp of one mango in food processor or blender.

Cut the other mango into small cubes.  Trim pork tenderloin and slice into 1-inch thick medallions.  Flatten slices lightly with hand.  Spray a skillet or medium saucepan with cooking spray or add a small amount of olive oil and heat on medium-high.  Brown pork for one minute on each side. Season each side with salt and pepper to taste.

Reduce heat and cook pork another five minutes to cook through.  Remove to plate and add mango to skillet or saucepan. Cook puree about, scraping up brown bits of pork, for about 30 seconds.  Add several drops of hot sauce and the mango cubes.  Toss cubes in puree while heating through.  Spoon sauce over pork and serve with pasta or hot cooked rice.

Do You Need a Cardiac Stress Test?

Heart Awareness

Cardiac Arrests

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A cardiac stress test measures how well your heart is able to perform when it is under physical stress and it is used to help diagnose heart problems. While February was Heart Awareness Month, every month is important to take care of your heart.  That’s why the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute list some of the following reasons why you may need a cardiac stress test:

  • You have experienced symptoms of reduced blood flow to the heart, including shortness of breath and chest pains.
  • You have arrhythmia symptoms during exercise, including a fluttering sensation in the chest, irregular heartbeat or feeling faint.
  • You have shortness of breath without chest pain following exercise

Lowering Your Blood Pressure through Diet

Food for Thought

 

 

Lowering Your Blood Pressure through Diet

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

According to a recent study done by the American Heart Association, one in three adults suffer from hypertension or high blood pressure.  While many people are prescribed medication to help reduce their blood pressure, nutritionists say that simply by eating your fruits and vegetables that you can help reduce your blood pressure naturally.

Fruits and vegetables are chock full of great vitamins and nutrients that will help to lower your blood pressure, and combined with medication and exercise you will be back on the healthy track.

Physicians recommend 4 to 5 servings of vegetables per day and 2 to 3 servings of fruit per day.

The following are some great blood pressure lowering options:

Vegetables: swiss chard, broccoli, cabbage, cauliflower, spinach and lettuce.

Fruits: citrus fruits, bananas, and apples.

While all fruits and vegetables are good for you, the above contain the appropriate amounts of the right vitamins and nutrients that when added to your regular diet will equal out to a heart-supportive diet.

By simply making some small changes to your every day eating and making sure to get the appropriate number of foods and vegetables in your daily diet, you will see your blood pressure numbers gradually decreasing.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

What the “Toes” Know

Healthy Living

 

What the toes knows

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

As odd as it may seem, your feet may be the window to your overall body health. Here are some things to look for regarding your feet that will give you clues that there may be other important body issues to look into.

Thick, yellow toenails – Toenails are not supposed to be thick and/or yellow.  Thick, yellow nails are most often an indication of a fungal infection living beneath your toenails.  People that have other medical conditions, like rheumatoid arthritis, diabetes and other immune deficiencies are more likely to get a fungal infection than those that do not have these conditions.  To treat thick, yellow toenails, you will need to consult a podiatrist.  While there are plenty of over-the-counter treatments for thick, yellow toenails, by the time your nails are already discolored and thick it is too late for any over-the-counter creams or medicines to work. You must discuss your options with a professional.

No hair on your feet or toes – If your feet or toes are lacking hair, it can be a sign of having poor circulation because of vascular disease.  If you notice that your feet and toes do not have any hair on them, you will want to consult your doctor to find out ways to improve your circulation thereby reducing your risk of acquiring vascular disease.

A wound that won’t heal on your foot – Wounds on your feet that just won’t heal could be an indication of diabetes.  Over time, elevated blood glucose levels can lead to serious nerve damage in your feet and because of this damage you may not feel when you have a sore or a wound on your foot.  If your wound continues to go unhealed there could be major problems, including amputation.  If you notice a wound that won’t heal on your feet be sure to contact your doctor to discuss your wound.  If you are currently living with or being treated for diabetes, be sure to check your feet often and mark any changes.